Archive for Dundurn

Hanley White Sox win midget AA provincial title

The Hanley White Sox defeated the Ponteix Pirates 6-5 on July 23 to win the Midget AA Tier 4 provincial baseball championship.

By Joel van der Veen

HANLEY — The Hanley Merchants went their whole first season without a single win.

In their second year, they showed modest improvement, winning two games.

So it was nothing short of a shock when the team, now renamed the Hanley White Sox, finished its third season by winning a provincial title.

The Sox defeated the Ponteix Pirates 6-5 on July 23 to win the Midget AA Tier 4 provincial championship.

“We didn’t expect that at all,” said Jason Bellina, the team’s head coach, adding that while the win was a surprise, the boys earned it just the same.

“It’s not like we’re a bunch of schmoes out there. They’re good ball players. It was fitting for them to win the whole thing.”

The midget team included 16 players, drawing from Hanley, Dundurn, Kenaston and Clavet, and played in the Saskatoon league.

All their games are played in the city, as Hanley’s diamonds aren’t in line with the league’s regulations.

The past season had been the team’s best yet, with three wins in the regular season and a brief run in league playoffs, where they reached the second round.

“They’re such a good group of guys,” said Bellina. “You could just see them getting better and better through the season.”

Initially they hadn’t planned to go to provincials, but later decided to take a stab at it.

“We figured, ‘Who knows? Let’s just see what we’re up against,’” Bellina recalled.

Midget AA Tier 4 provincials were held in Ponteix from July 21 to 23, beginning with round-robin play on Friday and Saturday. Six teams competed in two pools.

For the full story, please see the Aug. 14 edition of The Davidson Leader or call 306-567-2047 to subscribe today.

 

Motor home destroyed in fire near Dundurn

By Joel van der Veen

DUNDURN — A motor home was destroyed after catching fire on Highway 11 just north of Dundurn.

Laura Friesen, chief of the Dundurn Fire Department, said the crew received the dispatch at 3:16 p.m. on May 16.

Six members responded with four vehicles to the blaze, but the motor home was a total loss.

Friesen said the driver of the vehicle was travelling on the highway when he noticed signs of fire.

“It started to smoke, so he pulled off,” she said. “He managed to drive it off the highway when he knew there was trouble.”

The driver brought the motor home off the road north of town, near a storage facility.

The town office posted a notice on Facebook shortly afterward, noting that the fire was under control and asking residents to avoid the scene.

Friesen was unable to confirm any further details, but she said she believed the driver was not a local resident. There were no injuries reported.

“Person in distress” was an ice fishing shack

Emergency responders were called to Highway 11 south of Dundurn around 2:30 a.m. on March 25 after a report of a possible person in distress. They arrived on the scene and found an ice fishing tent and chairs.

Emergency responders were called to Highway 11 south of Dundurn around 2:30 a.m. on March 25 after a report of a possible person in distress. They arrived on the scene and found an ice fishing tent and chairs.

By Joel van der Veen

DUNDURN — Early Saturday morning, eight members of the Dundurn Emergency Services Team (EST) responded to a call of a possible person in distress.

A driver had phoned 911 after seeing what they believed was a body laying on the side of Highway 11, south of Dundurn just before the hill at Blackstrap.

Members were dispatched to the scene on March 25 around 2:30 a.m. They didn’t find a body, but they did manage to rescue an ice fishing tent and a pair of chairs.

Speaking to the Leader last week, fire chief Laura Friesen said they don’t want to deter people from calling for help in the event of an emergency.

“We will respond to emergencies, no matter what they are,” she said.

However, she said, it’s also helpful when people check things out and get the basic information before they call 911.

This way, they can ensure there is an actual emergency, as well as providing the pertinent information to dispatchers.

The Dundurn EST issued a message on Facebook that same day with a similar message.

“When in doubt, always, ALWAYS call 911,” the message stated. “It is better to be present and not needed, than to be needed and not present.”

Friesen said the circumstances can go both ways, noting she is aware of other situations where emergency responders weren’t contacted.

“I understand why people don’t want to stop,” she said. “You don’t know what you’re dealing with.”

Dispatchers sometimes receive calls about cars or trucks parked on the side of the highway, only to find that the vehicles have left by the time responders arrive. Friesen estimated they receive roughly one of these calls per year.

The post also advised that the owner of the ice fishing tent and chairs can pick up their property at the Dundurn Fire Hall.

Friesen said they’re not sure how the equipment ended up on the roadside, noting that it may have fallen off of a passing vehicle. It’s also possible the owner was from out of town.

As of Wednesday the owner had yet to claim their tent and chairs, she said, adding with a laugh, “I think after (our) rant they may be too embarrassed.”

Dundurn kids rush to give lacrosse a try

Calleigh Roepe scoops the ball into the netting of her lacrosse stick during a Try Lacrosse camp at Dundurn Elementary School on Jan. 31.

Calleigh Roepe scoops the ball into the netting of her lacrosse stick during a Try Lacrosse camp at Dundurn Elementary School on Jan. 31.

By Tara de Ryk

DUNDURN — Not too long ago, Parker Michalishen used to sleep with his lacrosse stick.

It’s an admission the 18-year-old SWAT Lacrosse junior team player made to a gym full of eager 7- to 12-year-olds at a Try Lacrosse session held in Dundurn on Jan. 31.

Michalishen told them that’s how much he loved the sport.

This is a passion Saskatchewan lacrosse players are bringing to communities near Saskatoon this winter.

Saskatchewan Lacrosse Association conducts these Try Lacrosse camps in co-ordination with Saskatoon Box Lacrosse and Saskatchewan SWAT Lacrosse. The sessions are for children ages 7 to 12 to introduce them to the sport in a fun and positive manner.

Dundurn’s session had 18 kids learning some of the lacrosse basics such as scooping, cradling, catching and throwing.

“I couldn’t skate, Michalishen says of why he started playing lacrosse five years ago. Instead of playing hockey, he decided to try the next closest thing.

“I fell in love with it as soon as I picked up a stick. I really love it and I want the game to grow.”

Saskatoon’s Box Lacrosse League saw a 25 per cent increase in registration last season, with most of the growth occurring in the younger age divisions, says Neil Hruska, the Try Lacrosse co-ordinator for Saskatoon Box Lacrosse and Saskatchewan Lacrosse Association.

He credits the popularity of the Saskatchewan Rush, a professional lacrosse team that plays at SaskTel Centre in Saskatoon, for the sudden growth in the minor levels of the sport.

“Because of the Rush, because they see how intense of a sport (lacrosse is), kids are being drawn to it,” Hruska says.

For the full story, please see the Feb. 6 edition of The Davidson Leader or call 306-567-2047 to subscribe today.

Dundurn lights up in support of new fire hall

Members of the Emergency Response Team — from left, Terry Benson, Rikki Chobotuk, Laura Friesen, Brian Harrison and Tom Willms — pose with the custom cake designed by Amanda Bell.  (Photos courtesy of Gary Boehm/GDB Imaging Photography)

Members of the Emergency Response Team — from left, Terry Benson, Rikki Chobotuk, Laura Friesen, Brian Harrison and Tom Willms — pose with the custom cake designed by Amanda Bell.
(Photos courtesy of Gary Boehm/GDB Imaging Photography)

By Joel van der Veen

DUNDURN — The fund for Dundurn’s new fire hall got a major boost as the community gathered for the lighting of the Memory Tree late last month.

Organizers said the project has raised more than $15,000 this year, and with donations still coming in, the total could exceed $20,000.

The ceremony on Nov. 27 included the singing of Christmas carols, lots of homemade goodies and a time to remember loved ones.

“It was a wonderful, moving ceremony,” said organizer Rosalind Arndt, part of the six-member committee behind this year’s program. “It was just so nice.”

Arndt estimated the crowd in attendance at over 100 people, including several members of the Dundurn Emergency Response Team.

Now in its fourth year, the memory tree lighting ceremony, initiated by Glen Cline, has become something of an annual tradition for Dundurn and area residents.

The tree, located outside the Dundurn Community Hall, was decorated by Patty and Sam Posnikoff. It will continue to be lit until mid-January.

Residents were invited to purchase a bulb for $20 in memory of a loved one, while personal or corporate donations and sponsorships were also accepted.

Arndt said there were upwards of 25 corporate sponsors this year. All donations in excess of $200 are recognized on a permanent plaque made by Waylyn Signs.

The Friday night program was emceed by Steve Menshenfriend and led off with the singing of “O Canada” by Brenda Presnell. Reaschelle Higginbotham and Courtney Schroeder read the list of people being remembered and those who had purchased the bulbs in their memory.

A group of students from Dundurn Elementary School, led by vice-principal Kirsten Tucker, sang a selection of Christmas carols. Dundurn students were also responsible for the paper angels that adorned the hall.

Baked goods, many of them homemade, were donated by community members for the occasion, while a special cake in the shape of a tree was provided by Amanda Bell.

Arndt said the memory tree project raised just over $43,000 for the new hall in its first three years. Donations are still being accepted through the office of the Rural Municipality of Dundurn.

Serving on the committee along with Arnst were Barb Olyniuk, Tanya Richmond, Alysia Kuzma, Carolyn Cartwright and Patty Posnikoff.

Reid challenges Wilson as RM of Dundurn votes for reeve

web-dundurn

By Joel van der Veen

DUNDURN — With continued growth expected in the Dundurn area, it’s now up to local voters to decide which candidate will be the one to lead them through it.

Voters in the Rural Municipality of Dundurn will head to the polls for a byelection on Nov. 18 to choose between Trevor Reid and Fred Wilson as their new reeve.

Wilson, 69, a longtime farmer and resident of the area, has served as reeve since January 2004; it was his resignation, which took effect in October, that made the byelection necessary.

He explained to the Leader that personal issues — specifically, a move into town and a decision to turn the family farm over to his son — were getting in the way of his duties.

“I just kind of felt that I wasn’t contributing to the council the way I felt I should be,” he said. “I was kind of second-guessing myself.”

Subsequently, he reconsidered his decision, and with the passage of time and the encouragement of several ratepayers, Wilson decided he was ready to seek another term.

He said he is still comfortable with the direction he and the council have been moving and the decisions they have made, including a temporary moratorium on new residential subdivisions.

Wilson cited the “adequate supply” of current subdivisions and added that he wants to encourage more commercial and industrial activity, though the RM must compete with the City of Saskatoon and other municipalities like Corman Park.

He also said they’re pleased with the current development of a new campsite at Blackstrap Provincial Park, noting that it had been a longtime council objective.

Wilson said that maintaining infrastructure to accompany growth in the RM is “pretty central to what’s been happening,” adding that they will need to keep an eye on roads over the next few months, as water levels and spring runoff take their toll.

He also wants to continue to push for a connecting link between highways 219 and 11, which would help establish the area as a tourism corridor south of Saskatoon.

“Our west side of our municipality is basically isolated from our east side,” said Wilson. “We don’t think that’s right.”

Running against Wilson is Trevor Reid, 39, a real estate agent and business consultant who moved to the area with his wife and two children just over five years ago.

He said he believes the time is right to “take the RM to the next level” and wants to put his 20 years of business experience to work for ratepayers, adding, “I just feel I can bring a lot of motivation and strive for change.”

Reid said he frequently hears from other residents that their concerns are not being addressed in a timely or effective fashion, adding that the most frequent complaints have to do with road maintenance and servicing.

As reeve, he said, he would aim to address the questions and concerns that are brought forward by ratepayers, noting, “It may not always be what they want to hear, but at least they’ll have an answer.”

He also said he perceives a division between the farmers and the more recent arrivals living on acreages, and he wants to bring those groups together and “get everybody on the same page.”

Reid has run to serve on the RM council twice. He was a candidate in the municipal election three years ago and also ran in a byelection in March. Both experiences have given him lots of opportunities to discuss issues with voters.

“I’ve heard a lot of what people had to say,” he said. “Everybody’s complaints and concerns are valid, and a lot of them are the same.”

Reid said he has heard about many smaller issues that aren’t as simple to address. He added that he would like to improve transparency on the RM’s financial reports, allowing residents to better understand the municipality’s situation.

Administrator Judy Douglas confirmed last week that once Wilson had resigned, the RM was required to hold a byelection under The Municipalities Act.

Both candidates have promoted themselves using campaign signs, which Douglas said is “unusual” for an election in their municipality.

The vote will take place on Nov. 18 from 9 a.m. to 8 p.m. at the municipal office on Second Street in Dundurn, with the results to be declared at 10 a.m. the following day.