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Tim Hortons prepares to open its doors

  By Joel van der Veen DAVIDSON — Trevor Dieno knows full well the power of a brand. In mid-May, signs went up on the Tim Hortons restaurant still under construction on Highway 11 at the south end of Davidson. Within minutes, Dieno said, cars were pulling up in search of donuts, deli sandwiches and double-doubles.

Tales from the jungle shared on Davidson’s stage

  By Joel van der Veen DAVIDSON — It was a journey through the jungle at Davidson School last weekend, courtesy of Missoula Children’s Theatre and more than 50 local students. The theatre company returned to Davidson School for a week, working with staff and students to mount a musical production of The Jungle Book. They

Records broken at sectional track meet

  By Joel van der Veen OUTLOOK — It was a record-breaking day at the east sectional high school track and field meet at Outlook High School on Wednesday. Nearly 30 records were broken during the meet, which drew competitors from nine schools. Jordan Matheson of Davidson broke the bantam girls record in the 100-metre dash

Air Cadets squad moving out of Davidson in June

  By Joel van der Veen DAVIDSON — When Jacob Heinrich joined 553 Sherlock Squadron last fall, he had one goal in mind: getting his pilot’s license. The 14-year-old Davidson resident said he knew learning to fly was part of the Royal Canadian Air Cadets program, but he soon learned there was lots more to it

Craik students dance for the cure

  By Joel van der Veen CRAIK — Joining the fight against breast cancer was the theme of the Craik School of Dance’s sixth annual recital last weekend. Dance instructor Amber K-D Vibert said she was inspired by the stories of women in her own family, including her mother, who has survived two separate bouts

Tim Hortons prepares to open its doors

Pictured is the outdoor signage on the new Tim Hortons restaurant in Davidson.

Pictured is the outdoor signage on the new Tim Hortons restaurant in Davidson.

 

By Joel van der Veen

DAVIDSON — Trevor Dieno knows full well the power of a brand.

In mid-May, signs went up on the Tim Hortons restaurant still under construction on Highway 11 at the south end of Davidson.

Within minutes, Dieno said, cars were pulling up in search of donuts, deli sandwiches and double-doubles.

“As soon as it was up, there was instant traffic flow,” he said. “They were driving around sawhorses trying to get to the drive thru.”

That alone demonstrates the power of Tim Hortons, perhaps the quintessential Canadian business success story.

The chain, founded in 1964 by the late hockey player for which it is named, now includes more than 3,600 restaurants across Canada.

That number will grow by one more this week, as the Tim Hortons restaurant in Davidson prepares to open its doors to its first customers on May 27.

For the full story, see the May 23 edition of The Davidson Leader, or phone 306-567-2047 to subscribe today.

 

Tales from the jungle shared on Davidson’s stage

Kaa (Tapanga Townsend and Maggie Boehm) promises to keep an eye on things in a scene from the Davidson School/Missoula Children's Theatre production of The Jungle Book.

Kaa (Tapanga Townsend and Maggie Boehm) promises to keep an eye on things in a scene from the Davidson School/Missoula Children’s Theatre production of The Jungle Book.

 

By Joel van der Veen

DAVIDSON — It was a journey through the jungle at Davidson School last weekend, courtesy of Missoula Children’s Theatre and more than 50 local students.

The theatre company returned to Davidson School for a week, working with staff and students to mount a musical production of The Jungle Book.

They worked after school every day from May 9 to 13, presenting the fruit of their labours to a crowd of 240 people on Friday night.

“These guys put together this whole musical with less than 20 hours of rehearsal time with us,” director Jessie Selleck told the audience.

Arlene Low, part of the committee responsible for bringing Missoula to Davidson, said the company offers a valuable opportunity for local students.

“They learn so much about the stage and the skills needed to be part of a theatrical performance,” she said.

For the full story and more photos, see the May 23 edition of The Davidson Leader, or phone 306-567-2047 to subscribe today.

Records broken at sectional track meet

Davidson's Ethan Schilling runs the bantam boys 80-metre hurdles event at the east sectional track and field meet in Outlook on Wednesday.

Davidson’s Ethan Schilling runs the bantam boys 80-metre hurdles event at the east sectional track and field meet in Outlook on Wednesday.

 

By Joel van der Veen

OUTLOOK — It was a record-breaking day at the east sectional high school track and field meet at Outlook High School on Wednesday.

Nearly 30 records were broken during the meet, which drew competitors from nine schools.

Jordan Matheson of Davidson broke the bantam girls record in the 100-metre dash with a time of 14.02 seconds, while Blake Allan ran the 400-metre dash in 1:00.92, taking the midget boys record.

Kenaston’s Trystan Stacowich broke the midget boys record in the discus throw, with a distance of 37.08 metres.

Loreburn students set three new records on Wednesday, including Anika Lakinger, who completed a shot put throw of 10.10 metres for the bantam girls.

Dodge Long finished the 800-metre run in 2:29.02 for the midget boys, while Maddy Vollmer recorded a triple jump of 10.10 metres for the senior girls.

For the full story, comprehensive results and more photos, see the May 23 edition of The Davidson Leader, or phone 306-567-2047 to subscribe today.

Obituary: Rolheiser, Betty

Betty Rolheiser

Betty Rolheiser

Elizabeth “Betty” (Siroski) Rolheiser
September 1, 1950 — May 2, 2016

Family and friends of Elizabeth Rolheiser are mourning the loss of a mother, sister, aunt, teacher and kindred spirit. After a very brief but intense battle with cancer, Elizabeth went to her final rest on May 2, surrounded by loved ones at St. Paul’s Hospital in Saskatoon. She will be remembered fondly by those who shared in her life, though this profound loss will also linger in our hearts.

Elizabeth was born to Frank and Rita Siroski and was raised on the family farm east of Kenaston. Her bothers Robert (wife Cathy) and Murray (wife Della) as well as sisters Anne (husband Travis Alder) and Maureen (husband Dennis Rempel) as well as numerous brothers- and sisters-in-law, nieces and nephews loved her and carried her in her hours of need.

Elizabeth took leave of her children Claire (husband Cameron Dyck), Tyler (wife Stephanie Dotchin), and Stephanie (husband Trynton Bowers), who will carry her legacy of love with them in their hearts. Elizabeth’s two grandchildren, Genevieve and Isabelle, will remember nothing but smiles, hugs and unconditional love. Elizabeth will find rest with those who have gone before her, including her husband Denis (deceased July 2009).

To all of her many dear friends, thank you for sharing in her journey and comforting her during the past weeks. Elizabeth was remembered on Monday, May 9 at a Funeral Mass at St Joseph’s Roman Catholic Church in North Battleford, Sask. The Battlefords Funeral Service provided the funeral arrangements.

Air Cadets squad moving out of Davidson in June

Former cadet Jaclyn Edwards performs her duties as reviewing officer during the 553 Sherlock Squadron's annual review on June 1 at Davidson Town Hall.

Former cadet Jaclyn Edwards performs her duties as reviewing officer during the 553 Sherlock Squadron’s annual review on June 1 at Davidson Town Hall.

 

By Joel van der Veen

DAVIDSON — When Jacob Heinrich joined 553 Sherlock Squadron last fall, he had one goal in mind: getting his pilot’s license.

The 14-year-old Davidson resident said he knew learning to fly was part of the Royal Canadian Air Cadets program, but he soon learned there was lots more to it than that.

On Friday, he and his fellow Cadets headed down to Buffalo Pound Provincial Park for a three-day weekend, setting up camp and learning basic survival skills.

Other activities this year have included trips to the Moose Jaw airbase and museums, along with gliding lessons. Heinrich also learned he’s been accepted to attend a three-week camp this summer at Cold Lake.

“We’ve done quite a lot of stuff that I didn’t know we would do,” said Heinrich. “It’s all been really fun.”

Jacob enjoyed it so much that his brother Reggie, who turns 12 this month, is joining the Cadet program as soon as he becomes eligible.

“I’ve been persuasive,” said Jacob with a laugh.

Unfortunately for the Heinrichs and other cadets, the Davidson squadron will soon be moving out of town, following a sustained decline in its numbers.

Capt. Krystal Klenk-Potts, the squadron’s commanding officer, said the new location hasn’t been determined yet, but it will be closer to Saskatoon.

“Ultimately, it no longer will be in Davidson,” she said, adding that it will retain its number and name. “It’s easier to move a squadron then to start a brand new one.”

For the past several years, the organization had told the Davidson squadron that it needed to improve its numbers or risk being reorganized.

This year, they set a firm target, telling Klenk-Potts that she needed to have 25 cadets registered by the end of February.

“I wasn’t too happy with that number,” she recalled adding that while enrolment has increased since last year, it never approached the required figure. “Even with this jump, we were on the cusp of being shut down or put on hold.”

Sherlock Squadron currently has seven cadets enrolled, coming from Davidson, Bladworth, Craik and Stalwart.

For the full story, please see the May 16 edition of The Davidson Leader, or call 306-567-2047 to subscribe today.

Craik students dance for the cure

Dancers spin in a circle during "Flower," the opening performance at the Craik School of Dance recital on May 7.

Dancers spin in a circle during “Flower,” the opening performance at the Craik School of Dance recital on May 7.

 

By Joel van der Veen

CRAIK — Joining the fight against breast cancer was the theme of the Craik School of Dance’s sixth annual recital last weekend.

Dance instructor Amber K-D Vibert said she was inspired by the stories of women in her own family, including her mother, who has survived two separate bouts with the disease.

“I was a teenager the first time my mom went through it,” said Vibert, who added that she wanted the recital to have an uplifting message, rather than focusing on tragedy and sadness.

The 10 members of the Craik School of Dance provided a series of upbeat and inspirational performances during the 45-minute program, presented on May 7 in the gymnasium at Craik School.

“Dance for a Cure” included 14 routines in a variety of genres, including lyrical, tap, jazz, hip hop and modern dance.

For the full story, please see the May 16 edition of The Davidson Leader, or call 306-567-2047 to subscribe today.