Archive for Davidson

Plenty of style at spring dance recital

Avery Ebenal faces a team of dancers — from left, Macy Palmer, Brooklyn Ruehlen, Jesselynne Palmer, Hannah Gust, Meghan Allan, Mackenzie Beck, Brookelynn Wick and Bella Thomson — in the opening jazz dance, "Enough."

Avery Ebenal faces a team of dancers — from left, Macy Palmer, Brooklyn Ruehlen, Jesselynne Palmer, Hannah Gust, Meghan Allan, Mackenzie Beck, Brookelynn Wick and Bella Thomson — in the opening jazz dance, “Enough.”

By Joel van der Veen

DAVIDSON — Family, friends and guests filled the gym at Davidson School for last Sunday’s spring dance recital.

The students of the Davidson Dance Club presented a 90-minute show on the afternoon of March 19.

The program featured a total of 30 performances in a variety of styles, including jazz, ballet, tap, creative movement, hip hop, lyrical and musical theatre.

In past years, the spring recital was held at the end of the season, typically in May.

This year, organizers decided to bump it up by a couple of months, giving students the chance to practise their routines before going on to competitions.

“You are their very first audience,” said Kelly Allan to the capacity crowd.

Allan served as master of ceremonies along with Richelle Palmer, introducing each performance.

The club had 74 dancers registered this year. Most of the students live in Davidson, with a small number travelling from Kenaston, Elbow and Craik.

Irene Williams of Regina was the sole adult instructor this year, spending two nights in Davidson each week during dance season.

Tiara Shaw, Emily Read and Sarah Allan also served as instructors, while Hannah Gust, Avery Ebenal and Chase Lyn Dean were teacher-helpers.

For the full story and a full page of photos, please see the March 27 edition of The Davidson Leader or call 306-567-2047 to subscribe today.

STC closure a blow for local bus riders

The STC bus bound for Regina is seen leaving the Davidson bus depot in this file photo.

The STC bus bound for Regina is seen leaving the Davidson bus depot in this file photo.

By Joel van der Veen

DAVIDSON — For Gloria Williams and others like her, the STC is more than just the bus. It’s a means of independence.

Williams, a Davidson resident, said she regularly uses the bus to travel to Saskatoon or Moose Jaw for medical appointments, or to buy material for her quilting.

Since the local bus stop was moved to the east side of Highway 11 five years ago, she’s had to ask people for rides there and back, something she hates doing.

“There’s nothing worse than pestering people,” said Williams. “I want to go and do it on my own.”

For Williams and those like her, the province’s announcement Wednesday that the STC would be shut down by the end of May was a significant blow.

Crown investments minister Joe Hargrave said Wednesday that the government would end operating and capital subsidies to the Saskatchewan Transportation Company (STC) for the coming fiscal year.

The company will close as a result, with freight being accepted for delivery until May 19 and passenger services ending May 31.

In a news release, Hargrave said the subsidies from the government had reached “unsustainable levels.”

Ten years ago, the government paid $25 in subsidies per passenger, but the cost has since increased to $94 per passenger.

The STC would require $85 million in subsidies to continue operating over the next five years, Hargrave said, adding that the government believes that money would be better spent elsewhere.

Arm River MLA Greg Brkich echoed those sentiments in an interview with the Leader on Wednesday afternoon, saying the government could not keep subsidizing STC at that level.

“How long are we going to keep doing it every year?” he said. “You have to make some tough decisions.”

Brkich said he recognized it would affect residents in his riding — maybe one or two in each town, he guessed.

Williams said she was angered by the announcement. She knows other people in town, both seniors and younger residents, who rely on the bus.

For the full story, plus additional coverage of the 2017 Saskatchewan provincial budget, please see the March 27 edition of The Davidson Leader, or call 306-567-2047 to subscribe today.

“Heartbreaker”: Sr. boys lose to Buffalo Narrows in regional final

 

Davidson's Mark Rettger meets some resistance from Garrett Campbell of Buffalo Narrows in the sr. boys basketball 1A regional final on March 18.

Davidson’s Mark Rettger meets some resistance from Garrett Campbell of Buffalo Narrows in the sr. boys basketball 1A regional final on March 18.

By Joel van der Veen

DAVIDSON — It was a crushing loss, but it came with a bittersweet touch.

As Davidson’s senior boys lined up to shake hands following a 96-84 loss to Buffalo Narrows in the 1A regional basketball final, coach Kim Rettger said he witnessed something he hadn’t seen in decades of coaching.

One of the Buffalo Narrows players approached Grade 12 player Andrew Read, who’d just ended his high school basketball career with a loss.

They shook hands, and then the winner reached out and embraced Read. Another player did the same for Rettger’s son Mark.

“It was a touching moment,” said the coach, adding that it was a sign of “great respect for what each of them could do.”

“I’m not a very emotional guy, but that made me kind of weepy-eyed.”

The loss to Buffalo Narrows brought an end to another outstanding season for the senior boys from Davidson, who won the school’s first-ever provincial title at Hoopla last year.

After winning at conference play the weekend before, the Raiders hosted 1A regionals on the weekend of March 17 and 18, welcoming teams from Kerrobert, Buffalo Narrows and Poundmaker to Davidson.

After a 79-35 win over Poundmaker in their opening game on Friday night, Rettger said the boys were feeling confident heading into the final on Saturday.

Buffalo Narrows earned their way to the final with an 82-51 win over Kerrobert the day before.

For the full story, please see the March 27 edition of The Davidson Leader or call 306-567-2047 to subscribe today.

Anderson rink wins A title in ladies bonspiel

Larissa McLaren (left) and Jill McIvor head down the ice during play on Saturday in the Davidson Ladies Bonspiel.

Larissa McLaren (left) and Jill McIvor head down the ice during play on Saturday in the Davidson Ladies Bonspiel.

By Joel van der Veen

DAVIDSON — Twelve teams took part in the annual Ladies Bonspiel on March 10 and 11 in Davidson.

“I think the whole thing turned out good,” said organizer Marla Dezotell.

Team Anderson from Saskatoon finished on top in the A event. The team consisted of Hanna Anderson, formerly of Hanley, and her teammates Stephanie Thompson, Kaylin Skinner and Jessica Thompson.

Coming in second in the A event was the Diane Hryniuk rink, which also included Donna Cross, Tasha Boyenko and Laura Church.

Liza Dahl and her teammates Jill McIvor, Ruth Percy and Larissa McLaren won the B event.

The Gail Prpick rink, which also included Karen Reich, Vonné Johnson and Selma Laird, took second place in the B event.

The Siroski rink defeated the Renee Manz rink to claim first place in the C event.

The Beth Booker rink beat the Agnes Viczko rink to win the D event.

Roughly 35 businesses and organizations donated prizes for the event, which also included a supper served Saturday afternoon by Roy and Corinne Kenny and crew.

Locals join medical service trip to Nicaragua

From left, Jeannie Lockwood, Erik Johnson and Mary Jane Morrison are pictured during a medical service trip to Nicaragua in February.

From left, Jeannie Lockwood, Erik Johnson and Mary Jane Morrison are pictured during a medical service trip to Nicaragua in February.

By Joel van der Veen

DAVIDSON — An average farm labourer in rural Nicaragua can expect to earn $5 US for a day’s work.

At that salary, even inexpensive dental care — $50 for a tooth extraction, $80 for a filling — is beyond the reach of most people.

“You can understand why a lot of them aren’t getting to the dentist,” said Mary Jane Morrison. “That’s got to be pretty tough.”

Morrison was part of a team of 24 Canadians who visited Nicaragua last month on a medical mission trip, providing free dental and optical care to rural residents in the developing country in Central America.

The trip lasted from Feb. 11 to 20 and was organized by Change for Children, an Edmonton-based organization that celebrated its 40th anniversary last year.

The group was evenly split between medical professionals and volunteers, with four senior dentists, three student dentists, two hygienists and three optometrists on board.

Three of the participants had local connections, including Morrison, who lives in Davidson and works as secretary for the Sacred Heart Parish.

Another was Jeannie Lockwood, a longtime resident of the Davidson area who now lives in Saskatoon, where she works as a licensed practical nurse at City Hospital.

Also taking part was dentist Erik Johnson, the son of Everett and Vonné Johnson of Davidson.

Johnson, who practises dentistry in a clinic in Lloydminster, has made two prior trips to treat patients in developing countries.

For the full story, please see the March 13 edition of The Davidson Leader or call 306-567-2047 to subscribe today.

Vandal adds graffiti to pro-life signs

This pair of signs, located east of Davidson on Highway 747, was recently targeted by a vandal.

This pair of signs, located east of Davidson on Highway 747, was recently targeted by a vandal.

By Joel van der Veen

DAVIDSON — Armed with blue paint, an unknown vandal apparently decided to go public with their opposition to a pair of pro-life signs east of town.

Graffiti was recently discovered on a pair of roadside signs that were installed by Mid-Lakes Pro-Life along Highway 747 in the RM of Arm River.

One side depicts an infant with a bow wrapped around its middle, surrounded by the slogan, “Life: The Greatest Gift of All!”

The other side features an older gentleman crading a newborn baby, accompanied by the words, “Respecting All Life as a Gift from God.”

The words “Pro Choice” were added in blue paint on both sides sometime in late February.

Deborah Doell, the chairperson of Mid-Lakes Pro-Life, said she was out of town when the vandalism was discovered, returning on Wednesday of last week.

She said the organization doesn’t have a meeting scheduled until mid-March so they haven’t had a chance to discuss their response yet.

Doell said the incident has not yet been reported to police, but that will likely be part of their course of action.

She said she’d like to find out who was responsible for the graffiti, adding, “I believe they’re hurting.”

The affected sign was installed by Mid-Lakes on private land with the permission of the landowner. The organization has installed roughly half a dozen similar signs around the district.

Another such sign was placed at an intersection further east on the same road.

In December, Mid-Lakes was ordered by the RM to remove the sign, on the grounds that it did not conform to the zoning bylaw and would obstruct the view of motorists.

Doell said they have complied with the order but have plans to re-install the sign further back so that it meets the RM’s requirements.

She said they’re disappointed by the vandalism, but not deterred, and they intend to keep installing signs.

Other attempts by Mid-Lakes to spread its message have met with challenges of various kinds.

Four years ago, the group sought permission to install a sign at the Davidson rink. The request was denied, on the grounds that council was opposed to religious or political messages appearing on town property.

Doell also said Mid-Lakes had inquired in the past about sponsoring a scholarship for graduates of Davidson School and was told they could do so, but would not be allowed to present the award at the graduation ceremony.

She said the group seems to be up against limits that other organizations don’t face: “Why is our freedom of speech squashed and theirs isn’t?”