Elbow RCMP: simple steps can lower risk of property crime

Const. Mike Neilson of the Outlook-Elbow RCMP detachment speaks to a small crowd at a public information session at the Elbow Civic Centre on Wednesday.

Const. Mike Neilson of the Outlook-Elbow RCMP detachment speaks to a small crowd at a public information session at the Elbow Civic Centre on Wednesday.

By Joel van der Veen

ELBOW — Preventing burglars from entering your house or business isn’t rocket science.

As Const. Mike Neilson told the public on Wednesday, it’s largely a matter of making it hard enough for potential thieves that they’ll give up and move on.

“They’re lazy, that’s why they’re doing it in the first place,” he said. “They’re looking for easy targets.”

“Stack the deck in your favour. Don’t make it easy for these guys.”

Neilson, a member of the RCMP Outlook-Elbow detachment, hosted a public information session at the Elbow Civic Centre on Wednesday, with about 10 people in attendance.

He and several colleagues provided advice and answered questions on preventing theft and deterring thieves from trying to enter homes, businesses and vehicles.

Neilson said rural crime rates have increased recently, blaming this on the downturn in the oil and gas industry.

Rural residents are often seen as easy targets, he explained, saying, “They’re isolated and no one’s around.”

He advised residents to keep their doors locked, noting that the vast majority of break-and-enters (B&Es) are committed on unlocked homes.

Neilson said residents should make it a habit so they are less likely to forget when they leave for longer periods.

“Even if you’re home, you should just lock your door,” he said. “Just like you’re putting on your seatbelt — you don’t think twice about it.”

Neilson said most would-be burglars are easily deterred and will keep moving to the next car or house until they find one that is unlocked.

For the full story, see the Feb. 6 edition of The Davidson Leader or call 306-567-2047 to subscribe today.

Comments are closed.