Archive for Elbow

Horsing around at Gallery 148

Checking out the restored rocking horse are Lois Kurp, from Victoria, B.C., and Sarah Hicks from Outlook.

By Joel van der Veen

ELBOW — This summer’s art show at Gallery 148 has drawn more than the usual number of neigh-sayers.

In this case, though, it comes with the territory.

The gallery on Saskatchewan Street is featuring a month-long show under the name “Horse Power,” featuring contributions from 10 artists.

Gallery owner Linda Kennedy said the name was suggested by contributor Dale Hicks from Outlook, following last year’s show on “The Art of Combines.”

“We just liked the name,” she said. “It’s such a catchy (phrase), it conjures up such interesting ideas.”

The show opening was held the evening of July 21, with several artists and many guests in attendance.

Refreshments were served and guests were also treated to a musical performance by “Just for Fun,” a vocal group accompanied by Dawn McTavish on keyboard.

Gallery 148 currently features the contributions of 29 artists. The “Horse Power” show will continue until Aug. 21, while the gallery is open till Thanksgiving.

For the full story, please see the Aug. 14 edition of The Davidson Leader or call 306-567-2047 to subscribe today.

 

Party marks 50 years since Gardiner Dam’s grand opening

Pictured are the five control towers atop the Gardiner Dam.

By Joel van der Veen

GARDINER DAM — Roger Baldwin remembers his first day on the job.

Hired in 1962 by the Prairie Farm Rehabilitation Administration (PFRA), his first assignment was at the Gardiner Dam, as an inspector for the shafts and tunnels then under construction.

The day he arrived, his supervisor, Dwight Kirton, took him to the top of a shaft 200 feet high.

“Don’t worry,” Kirton told him as they looked down. “It’s the last 12 feet that’ll kill you.”

Baldwin, now 78, was among the former employees who travelled back to the dam on July 14 to celebrate the 50th anniversary of its opening.

An estimated 1,000 people were on hand for what was billed as “The Best Dam Party of the Summer.”

The crowd included many former employees of PFRA and the other agencies and contractors who worked on the project.

Dignitaries on hand included Ralph Goodale, the federal minister of public safety, and Scott Moe, the provincial environment minister, both of whom spoke during a brief ceremony.

Also in attendance were the descendants of Saskatchewan’s fourth premier, James Gardiner, for whom the dam was named.

The event was a joint affair organized by SaskPower, SaskWater, the Water Security Agency and the Ministry of Parks, Culture and Sport.

Joel Perry, Saskatchewan Parks manager for Danielson and Douglas provincial parks, said 1,100 hot dogs were served, along with similar numbers for ice cream.

“We lucked out, except with the wind,” he remarked Friday, “though in Saskatchewan, that means it’s good for no bugs.”

Attractions included face painting and a bouncy castle, along with displays from the Saskatchewan Science Centre and conservation authorities.

The visitor centre was open to the public, and area musician Will Ardell performed on stage following the program.

Serving as emcees were Mike Marsh, president and CEO of SaskPower, and Susan Ross, president of the Water Security Agency.

Marsh said the impact of the dam is widespread, including 100,000 homes powered each year by the Coteau Creek hydroelectric station.

The construction of the Gardiner and Qu’Appelle River dams also resulted in the formation of Lake Diefenbaker, which provides water for municipal and industrial use, as well as irrigating hundreds of farms. The lake has also spawned a massive tourism industry that draws thousands of visitors to the region annually.

For the full story, please see the July 24 edition of The Davidson Leader, or call 306-567-2047 to subscribe today.

Art Knutson, 92, left a legacy beyond the rink

Art Knutson (skip), Ernie “Twink” Vaughan (third), Gerhard “Gay” Knutson (second), and Elmer Knutson (lead) won the Canadian senior men’s curling championship in 1978.

By Joel van der Veen

ELBOW — Their victories put Elbow on the map for a generation of curling fans.

A trio of brothers — Art, Elmer and Gay Knutson — and skip Doug Wankel made headlines in February 1967 when they claimed the provincial men’s curling title with a win over Harold Worth’s rink from Saskatoon.

Though Elbow was then in its boom years — its population had grown from 281 in 1956 to 470 a decade later, thanks to dam construction on the South Saskatchewan River — the Wankel rink was still widely seen as a long shot.

“They were the underdogs,” recalled Ernie Richardson, who skipped his own rink to four Brier wins between 1959 and 1963.

The Tankard win took Art Knutson and his teammates to the Brier, where they competed admirably, ultimately falling short of the national title.

But as friends and family recalled recently, that was merely one accomplishment in a life filled with them.

Art, who died in May at age 92, went from a Saskatchewan farm to the wartime skies over Europe, serving as a Lancaster tailgunner in the final months of the Second World War.

He was an accomplished curler who competed on the provincial and national stage for decades, as well as a dedicated husband and father.

“Anything he did, he excelled at,” said Art’s son Pat, who works for a printing company in Altona, Man.

Richardson, who grew up in Stoughton, said he met Art in the 1960s and felt a connection with the small-town curler. They remained in touch for decades, meeting up for an occasional round of golf.

“He was the kind of guy you couldn’t help but like,” Richardson told the Leader. “He never forgot where he came from.”

For the full story and more photos, please see the July 3 edition of The Davidson Leader or call 306-567-2047 to subscribe today.

Elbow makes move on First Nations reconciliation

Elbow Mayor Rob Hundeby is pictured in this file photo.

Elbow Mayor Rob Hundeby is pictured in this file photo.

By Joel van der Veen

ELBOW — Does Elbow have a racism problem?

No more so than anywhere else in Saskatchewan, said the village’s mayor, Rob Hundeby.

But the mayor said his village can set an example for the rest of the province and beyond by committing to tackle prejudice.

“I believe we’re taking a leadership role . . . (and) other municipalities, they’re taking note,” Hundeby told the Leader on Wednesday.

“This is something we can be proud of . . . We’re leading change.”

On Tuesday, Hundeby met with Chief Bobby Cameron to sign a memorandum of understanding and a pledge of reconciliation with the Federation of Sovereign Indigenous Nations (FSIN) in Saskatoon.

The agreement expresses the village’s commitment to eliminating racism by educating its staff and elected officials.

Topics to be covered will include the history of treaty, residential schools and colonialism, and the treaty and inherent rights of indigenous people.

Hundeby said he believes this is a starting point for his village and other communities to address the pervasive effects of racism.

“These people don’t need racist views or stereotypes judging them,” he said. “I do believe these people need hope, they need love, they need compassion, and we have to start somewhere.”

Hundeby said he was moved to respond after hearing Cameron speak about reconciliation at the Saskatchewan Urban Municipalities Association (SUMA) convention in February.

The chief had said it was significant that SUMA had extended the invitation for him to speak in a forum where indigenous voices are not usually front and centre.

The speech led Hundeby to reflect on his own background and ask himself whether or not he had ever held racist thoughts or attitudes.

“The answer was yes,” he said. “Saying an off-colour joke, stuff like that.”

Hundeby said he recognized how the influences of his youth had affected his attitudes towards indigenous people.

Afterward, he approached the chief to apologize and ask for forgiveness.

The mayor said Cameron accepted the apology and, placing his hands on his shoulders, asked Hundeby if he was willing to take this public.

Hundeby brought the matter back to council, who voted unanimously in April in favour of the agreement. The exact wording was finalized on the weekend, leading to Tuesday’s press conference in Saskatoon.

For the full story, please see the May 1 edition of The Davidson Leader or call 306-567-2047 to subscribe today.

Few fish found at family function

Keeping warm inside this tent shack at the Elbow ice fishing derby on March 11 were, from left, Barb Glubis, Laurie Niska and Jake Glubis.

Keeping warm inside this tent shack at the Elbow ice fishing derby on March 11 were, from left, Barb Glubis, Laurie Niska and Jake Glubis.

By Joel van der Veen

ELBOW — It was a great day of fishing — from the fish’s point of view, anyway.

A family ice fishing derby, organized by the Elbow and District Wildlife Federation, drew 34 participants to the Elbow Harbour on March 11.

A grand total of three fish were caught during the derby, and the organizers had to draw names to find winners for the other prizes.

Despite the slim pickings, organizer Blake Dorward said it was a fun day on the lake for the families who took part.

“We had a good day, it was fun,” he said. “We fully intend on doing it again next year.”

The event drew participants from the Line 19 communities and further afield, as far as Outlook, Moose Jaw and Warman.

Dorward said around 60 people were pre-registered for the derby, some of whom dropped out for hockey and other commitments.

“I’m pretty sure the weather scared a few people away too,” he said. “It wasn’t the warmest out there.”

For the full story and more photos, please see the March 20 edition of The Davidson Leader or call 306-567-2047 to subscribe today.

Elbow RCMP: simple steps can lower risk of property crime

Const. Mike Neilson of the Outlook-Elbow RCMP detachment speaks to a small crowd at a public information session at the Elbow Civic Centre on Wednesday.

Const. Mike Neilson of the Outlook-Elbow RCMP detachment speaks to a small crowd at a public information session at the Elbow Civic Centre on Wednesday.

By Joel van der Veen

ELBOW — Preventing burglars from entering your house or business isn’t rocket science.

As Const. Mike Neilson told the public on Wednesday, it’s largely a matter of making it hard enough for potential thieves that they’ll give up and move on.

“They’re lazy, that’s why they’re doing it in the first place,” he said. “They’re looking for easy targets.”

“Stack the deck in your favour. Don’t make it easy for these guys.”

Neilson, a member of the RCMP Outlook-Elbow detachment, hosted a public information session at the Elbow Civic Centre on Wednesday, with about 10 people in attendance.

He and several colleagues provided advice and answered questions on preventing theft and deterring thieves from trying to enter homes, businesses and vehicles.

Neilson said rural crime rates have increased recently, blaming this on the downturn in the oil and gas industry.

Rural residents are often seen as easy targets, he explained, saying, “They’re isolated and no one’s around.”

He advised residents to keep their doors locked, noting that the vast majority of break-and-enters (B&Es) are committed on unlocked homes.

Neilson said residents should make it a habit so they are less likely to forget when they leave for longer periods.

“Even if you’re home, you should just lock your door,” he said. “Just like you’re putting on your seatbelt — you don’t think twice about it.”

Neilson said most would-be burglars are easily deterred and will keep moving to the next car or house until they find one that is unlocked.

For the full story, see the Feb. 6 edition of The Davidson Leader or call 306-567-2047 to subscribe today.