Archive for Elbow

Few fish found at family function

Keeping warm inside this tent shack at the Elbow ice fishing derby on March 11 were, from left, Barb Glubis, Laurie Niska and Jake Glubis.

Keeping warm inside this tent shack at the Elbow ice fishing derby on March 11 were, from left, Barb Glubis, Laurie Niska and Jake Glubis.

By Joel van der Veen

ELBOW — It was a great day of fishing — from the fish’s point of view, anyway.

A family ice fishing derby, organized by the Elbow and District Wildlife Federation, drew 34 participants to the Elbow Harbour on March 11.

A grand total of three fish were caught during the derby, and the organizers had to draw names to find winners for the other prizes.

Despite the slim pickings, organizer Blake Dorward said it was a fun day on the lake for the families who took part.

“We had a good day, it was fun,” he said. “We fully intend on doing it again next year.”

The event drew participants from the Line 19 communities and further afield, as far as Outlook, Moose Jaw and Warman.

Dorward said around 60 people were pre-registered for the derby, some of whom dropped out for hockey and other commitments.

“I’m pretty sure the weather scared a few people away too,” he said. “It wasn’t the warmest out there.”

For the full story and more photos, please see the March 20 edition of The Davidson Leader or call 306-567-2047 to subscribe today.

Elbow RCMP: simple steps can lower risk of property crime

Const. Mike Neilson of the Outlook-Elbow RCMP detachment speaks to a small crowd at a public information session at the Elbow Civic Centre on Wednesday.

Const. Mike Neilson of the Outlook-Elbow RCMP detachment speaks to a small crowd at a public information session at the Elbow Civic Centre on Wednesday.

By Joel van der Veen

ELBOW — Preventing burglars from entering your house or business isn’t rocket science.

As Const. Mike Neilson told the public on Wednesday, it’s largely a matter of making it hard enough for potential thieves that they’ll give up and move on.

“They’re lazy, that’s why they’re doing it in the first place,” he said. “They’re looking for easy targets.”

“Stack the deck in your favour. Don’t make it easy for these guys.”

Neilson, a member of the RCMP Outlook-Elbow detachment, hosted a public information session at the Elbow Civic Centre on Wednesday, with about 10 people in attendance.

He and several colleagues provided advice and answered questions on preventing theft and deterring thieves from trying to enter homes, businesses and vehicles.

Neilson said rural crime rates have increased recently, blaming this on the downturn in the oil and gas industry.

Rural residents are often seen as easy targets, he explained, saying, “They’re isolated and no one’s around.”

He advised residents to keep their doors locked, noting that the vast majority of break-and-enters (B&Es) are committed on unlocked homes.

Neilson said residents should make it a habit so they are less likely to forget when they leave for longer periods.

“Even if you’re home, you should just lock your door,” he said. “Just like you’re putting on your seatbelt — you don’t think twice about it.”

Neilson said most would-be burglars are easily deterred and will keep moving to the next car or house until they find one that is unlocked.

For the full story, see the Feb. 6 edition of The Davidson Leader or call 306-567-2047 to subscribe today.

Jackpot event draws rodeo riders, fans to Elbow

Beth Manz is seen riding "Jet" in the barrel racing jackpot competition at Elbow on Oct. 1.

Beth Manz is seen riding “Jet” in the barrel racing jackpot competition at Elbow on Oct. 1.

By Joel van der Veen

ELBOW — With short notice and a late date, organizers of last weekend’s jackpot event in Elbow weren’t sure what to expect.

As it turned out, they had so many entries they had to move the start time back, plus a large crowd of spectators and a sunny day to boot (eventually).

“I was overwhelmed,” said Kelly Holbrook last week. “It was just fantastic.”

More than 100 contestants came to Elbow for the barrel racing and team roping jackpot event on Oct. 1, organized by the Lakeshore Stampede Rodeo Committee.

In addition to the rodeo events, a beer gardens and concession stand were operated at the site.

Organizers said they expected to clear roughly $4,000 from the event, with proceeds being used to organize a KCRA rodeo in Elbow in July 2017.

For the first time in more than 20 years, the village did not host a full-fledged rodeo this year, due largely to a lack of volunteers.

Holbrook said the turnout proved that the rodeo was missed. Plans are already moving ahead for next year’s event, which will be affiliated with the Kakeyow Cowboys Rodeo Association (KCRA).

In doing so, Holbrook said, they hope to have a more “family-focused” event that can include competitors at all ages and skill levels.

The KCRA schedule is organized so each local rodeo takes place over two days without overlapping, thereby allowing a high level of participation in each one.

“It’s a way different environment,” she said, adding that the KCRA has been steadily growing in recent years. “We cover the whole province for membership now.”

For the full story, see the Oct. 10 edition of The Davidson Leader or call 306-567-2047 to subscribe today.

Electronics firm celebrates 20 years in Elbow

Long-time employee Debbie Aadland cuts the cake at an anniversary party for Commutron Industries, Ltd., at the company’s office in Elbow on Sept. 2.

Long-time employee Debbie Aadland cuts the cake at an anniversary party for Commutron Industries, Ltd., at the company’s office in Elbow on Sept. 2.

By Joel van der Veen

ELBOW — Seeing the red maple leaf stamped on a product still means something important to a lot of people.

Few know this better than the staff of Commutron Industries, Ltd., an Elbow-based company that celebrated its 20th anniversary earlier this month.

“There’s still a hunger for investors and manufacturers to build a product that’s Canadian made,” said general manager Robert Leonardo on Wednesday.

The firm has a current staff of 18 full-time employees, assembling printed circuit boards (PCBs) and other electronic components at its facility in the village.

Commutron’s products are used in a wide range of industrial settings, including diagnostics and safety equipment, and in the agriculture, mining and transportation fields.

Customers and the general public were invited to an open house and barbecue on Sept. 2, which drew upwards of 120 people.

Leonardo said it was a great opportunity to celebrate the company’s success and reflect on the progress made over the last two decades.

The company was previously located in Saskatoon, where it operated under the name Bantron.

The move to Elbow came through a program then operated by the provincial government, offering grants to viable businesses willing to relocate outside of cities as a way of stimulating the rural economy.

For the full story, please see the Sept. 12 edition of The Davidson Leader or call 306-567-2047 to subscribe today.

Straker plays to packed house at Elbow’s Civic Centre

Singer-songwriter Jeffery Straker performs during a concert at the Elbow Civic Centre on Sept. 3.

Singer-songwriter Jeffery Straker performs during a concert at the Elbow Civic Centre on Sept. 3.

By Joel van der Veen

ELBOW — Jeffery Straker warned patrons at his concert last weekend not to mess with the lady running the merch table.

Dawn McTavish, his former piano teacher, was lending a hand by selling CDs, T-shirts and other items at the back of the Civic Centre auditorium.

“When I didn’t practise, she cuffed me upside the head,” he joked, “so just keep that in mind.”

Straker, a singer-songwriter and pianist originally from Punnichy, entertained a crowd of more than 100 in Elbow on Sept. 3.

The auditorium was filled nearly to capacity for the evening show, a fundraiser for the village’s community park.

Straker had played in Elbow previously as an opening act at another show, and was welcomed back warmly, with at least one audience member wearing red canvas shoes in imitation of his trademark footwear.

McTavish was Straker’s piano teacher for six years, offering lessons from her farmhouse near Raymore.

She has since retired to Elbow, where she plays piano for the Line 19 Choir. (Their repertoire includes an arrangement of one of Straker’s songs, “Prairie Tune.”)

McTavish described him as a “dream student,” adding, “I shipped him off to Regina when he got too good for me.”

For the full story, please see the Sept. 12 edition of The Davidson Leader or call 306-567-2047 to subscribe today.

Pastures seek plan to curb spurge growth

Pasture manager Ross Sigfusson speaks to guests during a tour of the Willner-Elbow community pastures on June 6.

Pasture manager Ross Sigfusson speaks to guests during a tour of the Willner-Elbow community pastures on June 6.

By Joel van der Veen

ELBOW — There’s no magic bullet, and if they’re going to stop this problem from spreading further, they’ve got to step up their attack.

If the language used by directors of the Willner-Elbow community pastures last week seems aggressive, there’s a good reason for it.

Leafy spurge was the focus of a public tour of the pastures, held the afternoon of June 6.

Despite efforts to control the invasive spurge, the noxious weed has continually spread, now covering an estimated 12,000 acres of pasture land on the east side of Lake Diefenbaker.

“It’s an ongoing battle,” said pasture manager Ross Sigfusson, who led the tour on Monday.

The event was hosted by the Willner Elbow Grazing Corporation (WEG) and the South Saskatchewan River Agri Environmental Group Plan.

Around 40 people were in attendance for all or part of the event, riding quads across the pasture and stopping periodically at points of interest.

The group included pasture patrons, area ranchers, representatives from other pastures and farm organizations, government employees and officials, and members of the media.

The tour was intended to increase awareness of the spurge and its ongoing spread, and to get various parties committed to a co-ordinated approach to bringing the weed under control.

Guests also got an up-close look at a current measure being used to combat the spurge: intensive grazing by a herd of 1,600 sheep and goats.

For the full story, please see the June 13 edition of The Davidson Leader, or call 306-567-2047 to subscribe today.